Anatomy of Things

The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and something else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.

—CHUCK CLOSE
[quote lifted from: thepacegallery / jonathanwinstone] (via 7knotwind)

(via slavin)

Cheap Trick - Surrender - from Budokan DVD (by cheaptrick)

7) Money - by querencia One of the major themes in Cryptonomicon that carried over (in a big way) to The Baroque Cycle is money. You introduced some “futuristic” views of currency and of where money might be going in Cryptonomicon, and you skillfully managed to do the same thing, while explaining some of the history of modern monetary systems, in the most recent books. You’ve obviously spent a lot of time thinking about money lately. Is there anything going on in the modern world with monetary systems (barter networks, for example) that you find particularly interesting? What do you see on the horizon with respect to money? Neal: Actually, what’s interesting about money is that it doesn’t seem to change that much at all. It became fantastically sophisticated hundreds of years ago. Back before people knew about germs, evolution, the Table of Elements, and other stuff that we now take for granted, people were engaging in financial manipulations that seem quite modern in their sophistication. So if I had to take a wild guess—-and believe me, it is a wild guess—-I’d say that money and the way it works is going to be a constant, not a variable.